Friday, January 15, 2010

USA - Max Cards with Colorano Cachets

These are some more US Max Cards with Colorano Cachets on nautical themes.
The top card is about Francis Marion (c. 1732 – February 26, 1795) who was a military officer who served in the American Revolutionary War. Acting with Continental Army and South Carolina militia commissions, he was a persistent adversary of the British in their occupation of South Carolina in 1780 and 1781, even after the Continental Army was driven out of the state in the Battle of Camden. Due to his irregular methods of warfare, he is considered one of the fathers of modern guerrilla warfare, and is credited in the lineage of the United States Army Rangers.
Some info on the Golden Hinde, the Clipper Flying Cloud and the Hyde Street Pier shown in my previous post.
Famous Sir Francis Drake’s Ship - The first ship to circumnavigate the World
The Golden Hind (or Golden Hinde) was an English galleon best known for being the first ship to successfully complete its global circumnavigation mission between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake. She was originally known as the Pelican, but was later renamed by Drake mid-voyage in 1577, as he prepared to enter the Strait of Magellan, calling it the Golden Hind to compliment his patron, Sir Christopher Hatton, whose armorial crest was a golden 'hind' (the heraldic term for a female deer). Hatton was one of the principal sponsors of Drake's world voyage.

ClipperFlying Cloud

The Flying Cloud of 1851 was the most famous of the extreme clippers built by Donald McKay in East Boston, Massachusetts, intended for Enoch Train of Boston, who paid $50,000 for her construction.
The Flying Cloud was purchased at launching by Grinnell, Minturn & Co., of New York, for $90,000, which represented a huge profit for Train & Co. Within six weeks she sailed from New York and made San Francisco 'round Cape Horn in 89 days, 21 hours under the command of Captain Josiah Perkins Cressy. On July 31, during the trip, she made 374 miles in 3 days. In 1853 she beat her own record by 13 hours, a record that stood until 1989 when the breakthrough-designed sailboat Thursday's Child completed the passage in 80 days, 20 hours. The record was once again broken 2008 by the French racing yacht Gitana 13 with a time of 43 days and 38 minutes.
In the early days of the California Gold Rush, it took more than 200 days for a ship to travel from New York to San Francisco, a voyage of more than 16,000 miles. The Flying Cloud's better-than-halving that time (only 89 days) was a headline-grabbing world record that the ship itself beat three years later, setting a record that lasted for 136 years.
.In 1862, Flying Cloud was sold to go under British colors without change of name, and was soon traveling between the mother country and Australia and New Zealand. Her latter years were spent in the timber trade between Britain and St. Johns, Canada. On June 19, 1874 the Flying Cloud went ashore on the Beacon Island bar, St. John's, Newfoundland, and was condemned and sold. The following June she was burned for the scrap metal value of her copper and metal fastenings.
Hyde Street Pier
The Hyde Street Pier is a historic ferry pier located on the northern waterfront of San Francisco, California, amidst the tourist zone of Fisherman's Wharf.
Prior to the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge and the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, it was the principal automobile ferry terminal connecting San Francisco with Marin County by way of Sausalito to the north, and the East Bay by way of Berkeley . It was designated part of US 101 and US 40. The ferries were operated by the Golden Gate Ferries, a subsidiary of the Southern Pacific railroad.
Today, the pier is part of the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park. Various historical ships are anchored to the pier, some available for self-guided or docent-led tours. Among the ships on display or in storage are the Balclutha, an 1886 square rigged sailing ship, as well as C.A. Thayer, Eureka, Alma, Hercules, Eppleton Hall, and over one hundred smaller craft.
Very many thanks to Hemant.

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